Archive for September 24, 2018

Lisa Weiss: Speaking, Cueing, and Now, Signing

September 24, 2018

The Cue Sign Movement: Sign Language + Cued Speech = Love

by Lisa Ann Weiss, Esq.

Before you click through to the next thing or toss this aside, please just read the whole thing through.  I am writing this because it is important to me to share my perspective with you.  I promise it will only take a few minutes of your time and it may be important for you or someone you love.

For more than a decade I have shared my deaf story.  Yes.  I have a deaf story, even though I am hearing.  I have a deaf child and this automatically gives me story rights.  I will not entertain any arguments about that.

Most of the time what interests people about my deaf story is that I chose to learn a visual mode of communication that is not sign language.  In 2004 when I realized that my 2 ½ year old child was deaf I read a book called “Choices In Deafness” by Sue Schwartz.   As I have explained almost every time I’ve shared my story, that book was when I first learned that there were choices. Until then I assumed that all deaf people signed.  From the beginning I have always believed in whatever choice works, at any time and in any situation.  What I have learned is that the situations are constantly changing and it is beneficial to have lots of options.

My child is a native cuer because I learned Cued Speech first.   I also chose to give my child cochlear implants and an education in listening and spoken language, so my child uses spoken English.  I have always known that my child would sign at some point and that I would also learn sign.

From my perspective, deaf stories oftentimes involve a lack of connection.  Certainly, that has been my experience.  My family has attended Cued Speech camps since 2005. I am grateful for them.  My whole family appreciates them.  It is one of the few times we feel connected to a larger community and are able to really improve our family’s communication skills.  I have always longed for a larger community.

My high schooler and I attended the first Cue Sign Summit that was held at Gallaudet University in June 2018.  It was intended to broaden the community of people who communicate who use ASL and Cued Speech.  There was instruction in all levels of Cued Speech and ASL, as well as four days of opportunities to interact and learn the latest research and about people’s experiences.  When we arrived, my 16 year old knew slightly more sign than I did, which was essentially none.  There were roughly 60 people at the four day event, all with varying levels of fluency in Cued Speech and ASL.  What I experienced at Cue Sign Summit is a broadening my deaf experience I have been yearning for.  I don’t believe I am the only person who feels this way and I don’t believe it is specific to me being a cuer.

ASL and Cued Speech sitting in a Tree, K-I-S-S-I-N-G.  First comes love.  Then comes connection, understanding, and respect for one another.  Then comes a whole new community of people who are happier, healthier, and united.  Okay.  So I’ve changed the words.  Plus it doesn’t rhyme at all.  But this what I see.  My child has now enrolled at a deaf school where they only teach in ASL.  The people at this school are welcoming my native cuer with their minds and arms wide open.

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Resources for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Mentors, Guides, and Role Models

September 11, 2018

Resources for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Adults Who Serve Families:

Family Leadership in Language and Learning (FL3)

Deaf and Hard of Hearing Guidelines:

These guidelines are intended to offer suggestions for EHDI systems as to recommended practices in provision of D/HH mentor/guide/role model services to families/children.

http://handsandvoices.org/fl3/fl3-docs/DHH-Guidelines.pdf

Interviews with Deaf and Hard of Hearing Adults and Other Resources:
Families can explore these links with a wealth of diverse perspectives through stories, articles, websites and research on this page.

http://handsandvoices.org/fl3/topics/dhh-involvement/resources.html

The Importance of Families Connecting With Deaf/Hard of Hearing Adults
An interview with Janet Des Georges, Executive Director of Hands & Voices and Karen Putz, Co-Director of Deaf and Hard of Hearing Infusion exploring the idea of meeting a D/HH adult who is different from your child.

http://handsandvoices.org/fl3/topics/dhh-involvement.html

 

Language, Literacy, and Social Development:

When a child is identified as deaf or hard of hearing, surrounding the family with multiple levels of support throughout a child’s journey to language, literacy, and social-emotional development adds to positive outcomes. This section covers websites, research, and resources.
http://handsandvoices.org/fl3/topics/lang-lit-soc.html

Communication Considerations: What Role Can Adults Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing Play

Family-to-Family Support
Parents who are just beginning the journey can be supported and learn from parents with lived experiences of the joys and challenges of raising a child who is deaf or hard of hearing. There is something incredibly unique and important in receiving support from other parents and families who have children that are deaf or hard of hearing and have “been there.”
This section covers support opportunities and resources, including links to other parent organizations:
http://handsandvoices.org/fl3/topics/fam-fam-support.html

Hands & Voices Facebook Groups:
D/HH Guides: https://www.facebook.com/groups/DHHGuides/
D/HH Guides, Role Models, and Mentors: https://www.facebook.com/groups/DHHMentorsGuidesRoleModels
Military Families: https://www.facebook.com/groups/HandsVoicesMilitarySupport
D/HH Plus: https://www.facebook.com/groups/deafhardofhearingplus
O.U.R. Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/HVOurChildren/
Unilateral Hearing Loss: https://www.facebook.com/groups/HVUnilateral

The National Center for Hearing Assessment and Management (NCHAM)
NCHAM has conducted a nationwide survey to gather information about programs that involve D/HH adults as role models, guides and/or Deaf Mentors in the EHDI system and beyond.
For a state-by-state list of D/HH Adult programs:

http://infanthearing.org/dhhadultinvolvement/states/index.html

NCHAM Deaf and Hard of Hearing Adult Involvement Learning Community:
http://infanthearing.org/dhhadultinvolvement/d-hh-learning-community-home.html

Publications Related to Deaf Mentor Programs: https://www.infanthearing.org/webinars/docs/deaf-mentor-summary.pdf

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